Connect with us

Canada

Canada is ‘weaving’ Indigenous science into environmental policy-making

Published

on

Our planet is changing. So is our journalism. This weekly newsletter is part of a CBC News initiative entitled « Our Changing Planet » to show and explain the effects of climate change. Keep up with the latest news on our Climate and Environment page.

Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Thursday.


This week:

  • Canada is ‘weaving’ Indigenous science into environmental policy-making
  • So, about that soup-throwing climate protest
  • Canada still hasn’t met its 2020 biodiversity targets. Here are 3 possible solutions

Canada is ‘weaving’ Indigenous science into environmental policy-making

(University of Manitoba)

Research shows that Indigenous communities in Canada are at higher risk from climate-related disasters such as flooding. Myrle Ballard is setting out to make sure Indigenous people are also part of the solution to climate change. 

Ballard is the first director of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s new division of Indigenous Science, a role in which she’s tasked with raising awareness of Indigenous science within the department and helping the government find ways to integrate it into its policies. 

« Indigenous science is … a science of the way of knowing the land. It’s a way of knowing the water, the air, everything about the Earth. Their knowledge of the weather patterns, their knowledge of how species migrate, » Ballard said in an interview with What On Earth. « It’s this knowledge that has enabled them to survive. »

Ballard, an assistant professor in the faculty of science at the University of Manitoba, is Anishinaabe from Lake St. Martin First Nation. Some of her own research looks at what Indigenous languages reveal about local ecosystems. She said her own first language, Anishinaabemowin, has a scientific management tool embedded within it. 

« We have words for various spaces and places right across the country that are very significant to the natural state of the ecosystem, » she said. 

The names of streams, for example, reveal details about the natural way water flows. Other words contain information about when fish start to spawn, said Ballard. 

« We have words like that that are very significant as a biological monitor throughout our language, » said Ballard. « They’re the indicators of the state of the ecosystem and the way it was before, to the present. »

Ballard, who was hired in July to lead the new permanent division, is using a process she calls « bridging, braiding and weaving. » Bridging means raising awareness about Indigenous science within the government, while braiding is when Western scientists work together on research with Indigenous peoples on the land. 

« The weaving process will be when the government, when the department ECCC, starts weaving Indigenous and Western science for better-informed decision-making, » she said. 

This concept is not new for Dominique Henri, a wildlife researcher with the ministry. She’s been collaborating for about 15 years on research with Indigenous partners in the Arctic and subarctic. Most recently, she worked with Inuit partners to study the impact of climate change on polar bears

« The bear biologists within our team learned tremendously from listening to elders’ stories and narratives, » she said. « It’s just been beautiful to see how it’s just different parts of a puzzle. [Western] science doesn’t know it all; Inuit don’t know it all, either. And by putting those pieces together, then you just have such a more rich, fuller picture of what’s going on. »

Henri said these partnerships aren’t easy to forge. It’s important to use a process that’s reciprocal, mutually beneficial and ethical, she said. And engaging properly with communities takes time. But Henri said having Ballard in this role will help. 

« This team has a crucial role to play moving forward. And I hope that we can learn from this, and that other departments can then also create similar structures and that other initiatives can spread across the country, » she said.

« I think this is the future. This approach of mobilizing multiple ways of knowing in environmental conservation is really needed, I would say, to address the ecological crisis we are facing now. »

During her first few weeks in the role, Myrle Ballard has been organizing a speaker series, inviting government scientists to learn from Indigenous scholars and experts on environmental issues. A spokesperson from the department said via email that the series has so far had three speakers and more than 800 participants.

Ballard is confident the work is already making a difference.

« We’re creating change, I know we are, because we’re getting a lot of interest from within the government, » she said. « We’re not quite there yet, there’s a lot of work to be done, [but] we’ll get there eventually. It just takes time. »

— Rachel Sanders

Reader feedback

Our interview with Todd Smith, a former pilot who is warning people to fly less for the sake of the planet, generated a lot of responses.

Jay McKean:

« At last! A former pilot telling us to cut back on our air flights. I think our government must legislate how many flights a year a person can take. What government wants to do that? Such legislation will be like reinstating the temperance movement when alcohol was banned. »

Karen Hertz:

« Stop wasting your time telling regular people who rarely use airplanes for travel. GO TO THE MAIN SOURCE OF AIRPLANE TRAVEL — THAT IS, THE UBER RICH!!! »

Rodney Harle:

« Todd Smith, the retired pilot, is wrong. Flying is not the problem. The problem is the fuel that is used, not only for flying, but also for all forms of transportation. The whole world must cease using ALL fossil fuels within the next 10 years. If we do not intend to do it, and do not do it, then the climate will continue to get hotter and wetter and stormier. »

Jeff Hawker:

« The recent article on the need for us to jet less mirrored what I have been thinking for some time. We humans are great at rationalizing things to suit our wants. Three per cent of CO2 from flying gets rationalized as it’s only a small part of the problem, and MY flight is only a piece of that, so it’s OK for me to jet around. Sadly, the CUMULATIVE EFFECT of everyone doing that is why we’re in so much trouble. »

Old issues of What on Earth? are right here.

CBC News has a dedicated climate page, which can be found here.

Also, check out our radio show and podcast. Iconic Berg Lake Trail in B.C.’s Mount Robson Provincial Park, near the Alberta border, was heavily damaged by flooding in 2021. As rebuilding begins, can Mount Robson become a blueprint for how Canada’s parks can adapt to withstand climate change? What On Earth now airs on Sundays at 11 a.m. ET, 11:30 a.m. in Newfoundland and Labrador. Subscribe on your favourite podcast app or hear it on demand at CBC Listen.


The Big Picture: The nature of climate protest

One of the most heated debates on the environmental beat in recent weeks concerns « the soup action » — namely, the incident at the National Gallery in London last Friday in which two demonstrators tossed tomato soup at the Vincent van Gogh painting Sunflowers to protest Big Oil’s patronage of the arts. The immediate response from most observers was alarm and disgust — they saw it as a pointless act of resistance that unnecessarily targeted a prized work of art and would likely sour people on climate action.

After the initial shock of the stunt wore off, the conversation around it began to evolve, with commentators providing more context. One of them was NASA climate scientist Peter Kalmus, who launched a Twitter thread by calling it « a visionary and inspired action. » As Kalmus pointed out, many people — especially young people — are frustrated by the relative inaction on reducing carbon emissions, and, in some cases, the expansion of fossil fuel projects. The two protesters from the group Just Stop Oil decided to do something that would command the world’s attention, which they did. The twist is that van Gogh’s work is behind glass and was thus unaffected. « The painting is *perfectly fine,* » Kalmus wrote. « What they DID damage? Crazy social norms that hold an object of art to be worth more than billions of people’s lives and life on Earth. Their action holds a mirror to a sick society. »

Scottish eco activist Craig Murray was one of many whose minds were changed. After originally calling the stunt « stupid vandalism, and counterproductive, » Murray later said, « I was wrong about this. The painting is behind glass and unharmed. In which case, this is a very effective bit of campaigning for publicity. »

A few days later, one of the young women who took part in the stunt explained her rationale in clear terms: « I recognize that it looks like a slightly ridiculous action…. What we’re doing is getting the conversation going so we can ask the questions that matter: Is it OK that [now-former U.K. prime minister] Liz Truss is licensing over 100 new fossil fuel [projects]? Is it OK that fossil fuels are subsidized 30 times more than renewables, when currently offshore wind [power] is nine times cheaper?… This is the conversation we need to be having now, because we don’t have time to waste. »

(Just Stop Oil/The Associated Press)

Hot and bothered: Provocative ideas from around the web


Canada still hasn’t met its 2020 biodiversity targets. Here are 3 possible solutions

(The Canadian Press)

In less than two months, Canada will host delegates from around the world for a United Nations summit on biodiversity. But as a host country, it is struggling to solve its own biodiversity problem.

The 15th Conference of the Parties (COP15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity will meet in Montreal to address accelerating species decline globally and negotiate a new framework for protecting nature, with a key commitment of conserving at least 30 per cent of land and oceans by 2030.

Canada, a member of the High Ambition Coalition, has already committed to the 30 by 30 pledge. Yet the federal government has failed to meet its biodiversity commitments for 2020, casting doubt on how likely it is to achieve those 2030 goals. 

The most recent data shows land and freshwater conservation in Canada is falling short of the 17 per cent target for 2020, with 13.5 per cent of terrestrial area currently protected. In terms of protecting marine life, the country has made more progress — 13.9 per cent of marine and coastal areas is conserved, surpassing the 2020 goal of 10 per cent.

As COP15 in Montreal draws near, here are some solutions that could change the status quo. 

Grassroots stewardship

A Canadian initiative launched in October hopes to help spur grassroots action by making it easier for the public at large to understand where crucial habitats are located. 

The Key Biodiversity Areas program has an interactive map that visualizes biodiversity hotspots in Canada, where rare species and ecosystems are concentrated.

Areas identified on the map aren’t guaranteed to be protected or conserved. Instead, the idea is that by sharing the information publicly, the program can be used as a springboard for conservation efforts by citizens, community organizations and Indigenous-led stewardship. 

« We’ve already had people in all sorts of sectors saying, ‘OK, if this is identified as a key biodiversity area, we might be able to get more funding for this, to be able to steward it better,' » said Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne, director of Key Biodiversity Areas at Wildlife Conservation Society Canada.

Until now, Raudsepp-Hearne said that information didn’t exist in a standardized, national format.

Accounting for forests and wetlands — literally

Another idea being pitched is adding biodiversity to the balance sheet, so to speak, to ensure natural assets are factored into government decision-making.

A recent paper, from the University of Waterloo’s Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation, calls for the establishment of national guidelines to value green infrastructure (wetlands, forests and lakes) in the same way that is standard practice for « grey » infrastructure (roads, dams and water treatment plants). 

« Every day, people benefit from services that nature provides, be that flood protection or protection from extreme heat or purifying our water or air. But we take those services for granted, » said Joanna Eyquem, managing director of climate resilient infrastructure at the Centre on Climate Adaptation.

While some have pushed back against this approach, arguing nature can’t be limited to a financial value, Eyquem said it’s not about slapping a price tag on nature as a whole, but on the services it provides. 

« If we say nature is worth so much that we’re not going to put a price tag on it, we’re actually putting a price tag of zero [on it], » she said. 

A stronger federal biodiversity law

Some activists say what’s needed is a federal law to guarantee the protection of flora and fauna in the country.

Salomé Sané, a Greenpeace Canada climate campaigner who worked on a paper calling for biodiversity legislation, said a law would hold Ottawa accountable on translating biodiversity promises into concrete action.

« We want an act that sets clear biodiversity targets, clear implementation mechanisms and clear legal recourses in the case of a failed target. »

While Canada does have some biodiversity protections in place, such as the Species At Risk Act (SARA), the government has long been criticized for its reticence in using the powers enshrined in the act.

Sané is hopeful the COP15 summit will be a turning point.

« We really want it to be like the Paris [agreement] moment —  if not more — for biodiversity, » she said. « It’s that once in a decade opportunity for governments around the world. »

Jaela Bernstien

Stay in touch!

Are there issues you’d like us to cover? Questions you want answered? Do you just want to share a kind word? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at [email protected]

Sign up here to get What on Earth? in your inbox every Thursday.

Editor: Andre Mayer | Logo design: Sködt McNalty

Canada

Des pouvoirs étendus pour le cabinet, le premier ministre retiré du projet de loi alors que la loi sur la souveraineté de l’Alberta approche de la ligne d’arrivée

Published

on

Par

La législature albertaine a voté pour retirer du projet de loi sur la souveraineté du gouvernement une disposition controversée qui accordait au cabinet de la première ministre Danielle Smith le pouvoir de contourner la législature et de réécrire les lois comme bon lui semblait.

Le caucus conservateur uni de Smith a utilisé sa majorité mercredi soir pour adopter un amendement affirmant que la législature albertaine a toujours le dernier mot en matière de législation.

L’opposition NPD a voté contre l’amendement, affirmant que la législation reste « un fouillis brûlant » de présomptions inconstitutionnelles et de pouvoirs provinciaux capricieux qui offensent le processus démocratique et freinent les investissements des entreprises.

Le projet de loi a été présenté il y a un peu plus d’une semaine par Smith comme pièce maîtresse de la législation de son gouvernement pour résister à ce qu’il appelle l’intrusion fédérale dans les domaines de compétence provinciale en vertu de la Constitution.

Avant le vote, plusieurs membres du NPD, dont la chef Rachel Notley, ont renouvelé leur appel pour que le projet de loi soit abandonné.

Notley a déclaré que bien que le projet de loi annule effectivement le pouvoir du Cabinet de réécrire les lois, un changement d’accompagnement réduisant la définition du préjudice fédéral était toujours formulé de manière trop ambiguë pour être efficace.

Notley dit que le projet de loi reste défectueux

Elle a déclaré que le déploiement du projet de loi avait été « une leçon d’incompétence législative » étant donné que le Premier ministre avait présenté le projet de loi huit jours plus tôt et avait rejeté pendant des jours les accusations selon lesquelles il avait accordé à son cabinet des pouvoirs étendus avant, face aux critiques croissantes, d’annoncer qu’il y aurait effectivement des changements.

Notley a déclaré que des défauts flagrants subsistaient dans le projet de loi étant donné qu’il indique que la législature, et non les tribunaux, décide de ce qui est et n’est pas constitutionnel.

Elle a déclaré que le projet de loi accorde toujours un pouvoir étendu et indéfini au Cabinet pour ordonner aux municipalités, aux régions sanitaires, aux écoles et aux forces de police municipales de résister à la mise en œuvre des lois fédérales.

Et elle a dit que Smith avait profondément laissé tomber les chefs des traités de l’Alberta en ne les consultant pas avant de présenter le projet de loi.

La chef du NPD de l’Alberta, Rachel Notley, a déclaré que des défauts flagrants subsistaient dans le projet de loi, car il stipule que la législature, et non les tribunaux, décide de ce qui est et n’est pas constitutionnel. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

« Ils ont vraiment tout gâché », a déclaré Notley, ajoutant que l’absence de consultation « enflammerait absolument la relation de nation à nation d’une importance cruciale qui devrait exister entre ce premier ministre et les dirigeants des traités ».

La porte-parole du NPD en matière de finances, Shannon Phillips, a déclaré que bien que le projet de loi vise Ottawa, il s’agit en fait d’une attaque à cheval de Troie contre les Albertains eux-mêmes par un gouvernement qui ne peut pas voir la politique des griefs passés et ses propres drames internes pour faire le travail de base mais nécessaire de fournir une bonne santé les soins, l’éducation et les services sociaux.

« Éliminez ce désordre brûlant », a déclaré Phillips aux bancs de l’UCP. « Cela ne le sauve que si ce projet de loi est entièrement retiré. »

Aucun membre de l’UCP n’a parlé du projet de loi mercredi soir avant de voter pour adopter l’amendement.

Le vote est intervenu après que les membres de l’UCP ont utilisé leur majorité pour adopter une motion du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, Joseph Schow, visant à limiter le débat – la deuxième fois qu’il l’a fait dans le cadre d’un débat sur ce projet de loi.

De telles mesures sont autorisées pour équilibrer la discussion avec le maintien des affaires de la maison en mouvement.

Schow a déclaré que 15 heures de débat sont un total sain, d’autant plus que le NPD a déclaré que cela ne fonctionnerait pas pour améliorer le projet de loi.

« Si l’opposition n’a pas d’amendements à proposer, alors nous allons arrêter de faire perdre le temps de l’assemblée et passer aux affaires du peuple », a déclaré Schow.

Le projet de loi est passé en troisième et dernière lecture mercredi soir.

Continue Reading

Canada

Des pouvoirs étendus pour le cabinet, le premier ministre retiré du projet de loi alors que la loi sur la souveraineté de l’Alberta approche de la ligne d’arrivée

Published

on

Par

La législature albertaine a voté pour retirer du projet de loi sur la souveraineté du gouvernement une disposition controversée qui accordait au cabinet de la première ministre Danielle Smith le pouvoir de contourner la législature et de réécrire les lois comme bon lui semblait.

Le caucus conservateur uni de Smith a utilisé sa majorité mercredi soir pour adopter un amendement affirmant que la législature albertaine a toujours le dernier mot en matière de législation.

L’opposition NPD a voté contre l’amendement, affirmant que la législation reste « un fouillis brûlant » de présomptions inconstitutionnelles et de pouvoirs provinciaux capricieux qui offensent le processus démocratique et freinent les investissements des entreprises.

Le projet de loi a été présenté il y a un peu plus d’une semaine par Smith comme pièce maîtresse de la législation de son gouvernement pour résister à ce qu’il appelle l’intrusion fédérale dans les domaines de compétence provinciale en vertu de la Constitution.

Avant le vote, plusieurs membres du NPD, dont la chef Rachel Notley, ont renouvelé leur appel pour que le projet de loi soit abandonné.

Notley a déclaré que bien que le projet de loi annule effectivement le pouvoir du Cabinet de réécrire les lois, un changement d’accompagnement réduisant la définition du préjudice fédéral était toujours formulé de manière trop ambiguë pour être efficace.

Notley dit que le projet de loi reste défectueux

Elle a déclaré que le déploiement du projet de loi avait été « une leçon d’incompétence législative » étant donné que le Premier ministre avait présenté le projet de loi huit jours plus tôt et avait rejeté pendant des jours les accusations selon lesquelles il avait accordé à son cabinet des pouvoirs étendus avant, face aux critiques croissantes, d’annoncer qu’il y aurait effectivement des changements.

Notley a déclaré que des défauts flagrants subsistaient dans le projet de loi étant donné qu’il indique que la législature, et non les tribunaux, décide de ce qui est et n’est pas constitutionnel.

Elle a déclaré que le projet de loi accorde toujours un pouvoir étendu et indéfini au Cabinet pour ordonner aux municipalités, aux régions sanitaires, aux écoles et aux forces de police municipales de résister à la mise en œuvre des lois fédérales.

Et elle a dit que Smith avait profondément laissé tomber les chefs des traités de l’Alberta en ne les consultant pas avant de présenter le projet de loi.

« Ils ont vraiment tout gâché », a déclaré Notley, ajoutant que l’absence de consultation « enflammerait absolument la relation de nation à nation d’une importance cruciale qui devrait exister entre ce premier ministre et les dirigeants des traités ».

La porte-parole du NPD en matière de finances, Shannon Phillips, a déclaré que bien que le projet de loi vise Ottawa, il s’agit en fait d’une attaque à cheval de Troie contre les Albertains eux-mêmes par un gouvernement qui ne peut pas voir la politique des griefs passés et ses propres drames internes pour faire le travail de base mais nécessaire de fournir une bonne santé les soins, l’éducation et les services sociaux.

« Éliminez ce désordre brûlant », a déclaré Phillips aux bancs de l’UCP. « Cela ne le sauve que si ce projet de loi est entièrement retiré. »

Aucun membre de l’UCP n’a parlé du projet de loi mercredi soir avant de voter pour adopter l’amendement.

Le vote est intervenu après que les membres de l’UCP ont utilisé leur majorité pour adopter une motion du leader du gouvernement à la Chambre, Joseph Schow, visant à limiter le débat – la deuxième fois qu’il l’a fait dans le cadre d’un débat sur ce projet de loi.

De telles mesures sont autorisées pour équilibrer la discussion avec le maintien des affaires de la maison en mouvement.

Schow a déclaré que 15 heures de débat sont un total sain, d’autant plus que le NPD a déclaré que cela ne fonctionnerait pas pour améliorer le projet de loi.

« Si l’opposition n’a pas d’amendements à proposer, alors nous allons arrêter de faire perdre le temps de l’assemblée et passer aux affaires du peuple », a déclaré Schow.

Le projet de loi est passé en troisième et dernière lecture mercredi soir.

Continue Reading

Canada

Les chefs de l’APN adoptent un front unifié et exigent qu’Ottawa paie un «minimum» de 20 milliards de dollars aux survivants de l’aide sociale à l’enfance

Published

on

Par

Les chefs de l’Assemblée des Premières Nations ont convenu de mettre leurs différends de côté et d’exiger que le Canada indemnise immédiatement les personnes lésées par le système de protection de l’enfance sous-financé dans les réserves, lors d’une manifestation d’unité de 11 heures mercredi soir à Ottawa.

Les délégués réunis pour l’assemblée annuelle d’hiver de l’APN ont entendu des appels passionnés alors qu’ils réfléchissaient à l’opportunité de soutenir un accord de règlement de recours collectif de 20 milliards de dollars ou le Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne, qui a refusé d’approuver l’accord.

Mais à la suite d’une intervention du sénateur à la retraite et ancien président de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation Murray Sinclair, les chefs ont convenu de combiner des résolutions concurrentes et de présenter au gouvernement canadien un front uni.

La nouvelle résolution, qui a été adoptée après des câlins et des larmes, a exhorté le Canada à placer « le minimum de 20 milliards de dollars » destinés à l’indemnisation dans un compte portant intérêt – puis à indemniser immédiatement toutes les victimes couvertes à la fois par les décisions du tribunal et le recours collectif.

« Je tiens à dire à quel point je suis honorée que nous ayons pu réunir les enfants et les familles – ceux qui ont été blessés par le Canada », a déclaré Cindy Blackstock, directrice générale de la First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, alors qu’elle recevait une distinction ovation pour son dévouement à la cause.

Plus tôt dans la journée, Carolyn Buffalo, l’une des principales plaignantes faisant avancer le recours collectif, a également été applaudie alors qu’elle exhortait les chefs à « mettre la politique de côté » et à faire ce qui est le mieux pour les enfants.

« Il ne s’agit d’aucun d’entre nous. Il ne s’agit d’aucune personne. Il ne s’agit d’aucune organisation. Il s’agit des enfants et de leurs familles », a-t-elle déclaré.

« Alors finissons-en. Pas de combat. »

Le fils de Buffalo, Noah Buffalo-Jackson, un autre demandeur principal, souffre de paralysie cérébrale et a besoin d’un fauteuil roulant, de soins 24 heures sur 24 et d’un équipement spécial à son domicile.

Carolyn Buffalo se bat pour obtenir une indemnisation pour son fils de 20 ans, Noah Buffalo-Jackson, qui souffre de paralysie cérébrale grave et s’est vu refuser des services essentiels par Ottawa. (Brian Morris/CBC)

Buffalo-Jackson représente des jeunes privés de services essentiels qui auraient dû être disponibles en vertu de ce qu’on appelle le principe de Jordan. Sa mère représente des familles comme la leur qui ont souffert tout en luttant pour accéder aux soins dont elles ont besoin.

Buffalo a parlé lors d’une séance plénière du règlement de 20 milliards de dollars et d’un accord distinct de 20 milliards de dollars sur la réforme à long terme du système de protection de l’enfance, qui forment ensemble l’engagement proposé par le gouvernement canadien de 40 milliards de dollars pour résoudre un problème de longue date des droits de l’homme plainte.

Assurez-vous qu' »aucun enfant n’est laissé pour compte », dit Blackstock

Blackstock a déposé la plainte avec l’AFN en 2007, mais ils ont adopté des points de vue opposés sur la question de l’indemnisation jusqu’à l’adoption de la résolution de mercredi.

« Nous pouvons nous assurer que dans notre canot de justice des Premières Nations, aucun enfant ne verra son argent disparaître et aucun enfant ne sera laissé pour compte dans la justice. Nous en sommes capables », a déclaré Blackstock aux chefs avant le vote.

« Nous sommes allés si loin ensemble, et nous ne sommes pas loin de franchir cette ligne d’arrivée ensemble. Nous allons montrer à nos enfants que nous les aimons assez pour nous battre pour eux, et nous les aimons assez pour nous assurer que ce combat est fait d’une manière qui les honore, et c’est une stratégie oui/et. »

Cindy Blackstock, directrice générale de la Société de soutien à l’enfance et à la famille des Premières Nations du Canada, est reconnue par le président de la Chambre des communes, ainsi que ses collègues récipiendaires du prix Impact 2022 du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada, après la période des questions sur la Colline du Parlement à Ottawa le 1er décembre. (Justin Tang/La Presse Canadienne)

Le tribunal a confirmé la plainte en matière de droits de la personne en 2016. Il a ordonné au Canada de verser le maximum légal de 40 000 $ aux enfants et à leurs familles lésés par la discrimination entre 2006 et aujourd’hui. Le directeur parlementaire du budget fédéral a estimé qu’il en coûterait 15 milliards de dollars pour obéir à l’ordre et payer l’indemnisation.

L’organisation de Blackstock a fait valoir que les enfants ayant droit à une indemnisation en vertu de l’ordre permanent du tribunal seraient exclus du recours collectif, une position avec laquelle le tribunal était d’accord.

Le recours collectif promet 20 milliards de dollars aux membres du groupe qui ont été lésés entre 1991, date à laquelle la politique discriminatoire est entrée en vigueur, et maintenant.

Ainsi, bien que le recours collectif laisse de côté certaines personnes que l’ordonnance du tribunal compenserait, le recours collectif attire également d’autres personnes, a déclaré l’avocat général de l’APN, Stuart Wuttke.

« L’argument selon lequel nous devrions accepter le tribunal parce qu’il est parfait ? Ce n’est pas parfait. C’est loin d’être le cas », a-t-il dit aux chefs.

« Les gens disent que l’accord de règlement de l’APN laisse des gens derrière ; les ordonnances du tribunal laissent un tas de gens derrière. Travaillons ensemble, comblons les lacunes. »

Continue Reading

Tandance